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Tax Alerts
Tax Briefing(s)

Tax provisions are often included as revenue raisers in non-tax bills and this year is no exception. A massive trade package making its way through Congress contains a number of tax measures, impacting both individuals and businesses. At the same time, some stand-alone tax bills are moving forward in the House and Senate.


The IRS has responded to criticism from the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration and the National Taxpayer Advocate, among others, that resolution of identity theft accounts takes too long by increasing its measures to flag suspicious tax returns, prevent issuance of fraudulent tax refunds, and to expedite identity theft case processing. As a result, the IRS's resolution time has experienced a moderate improvement from an average of 312 days, as TIGTA reported in September 2013, to an average of 278 days as reported in March 2015. (The 278-day average was based on a statistically valid sampling of 100 cases resolved between August 1, 2011, and July 31, 2012.) The IRS has recently stated that its resolution time dropped to 120 days for cases received in filing season 2013.


Employers of course have to pay employment taxes on the wages they pay to their employees. A nanny who takes care of a child is considered a household employee, and the parent or other responsible person is her household employer. Housekeepers, maids, babysitters, and others who work in or around the residence are employees. Repairmen and other business people who provide services as independent contractors are not employees. An individual who is under age 18 or who is a student is not an employee. 


Under Code Sec. 25B, a low-income taxpayer can claim a tax credit for a portion of the amounts contributed to an individual retirement account, 401(k) plan, or other retirement plan. A credit is allowed for up to $2,000 of contributions to qualified retirement savings plans. The maximum credit is $1,000 for individuals and $2,000 for married couples. A taxpayer's credit amount is based on his or her filing status, adjusted gross income, tax liability and amount contributed to qualifying retirement programs. However, the percentage of contributions for which the credit is allowed decreases depending on the individual's adjusted gross income.


A taxpayer who discovers an error after filing his or her income tax return may need to file an amended return. A change in filing status, income, deductions, or credits would require an amended return. This could happen, for example, if an investment broker sends a corrected Form 1099 that changes the amount of dividends or capital gains earned by the taxpayer. Or a taxpayer who sold stock may recalculate the basis of the stock for determining gain or loss. A taxpayer amending his or her federal income tax return may also need to amend a state tax return, to reflect the change or correction.


As an individual or business, it is your responsibility to be aware of and to meet your tax filing/reporting deadlines. This calendar summarizes important federal tax reporting and filing data for individuals, businesses and other taxpayers for the month of June 2015.